Intrabacterial iron storage in gram-negative bacteria
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Intrabacterial iron storage in gram-negative bacteria

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Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Bacterial growth,
  • Iron -- Physiological effect

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Martha Ann McCabe
The Physical Object
Pagination88 leaves :
Number of Pages88
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14453173M

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Enteric Gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli, biosynthesize and deploy the triscatecholate siderophore enterobactin (Ent) in the vertebrate host to acquire iron, an essential nutrient. We report that Ent–Cipro, a synthetic siderophore–antibiotic conjugate based on the native Ent platform that harbors an alkyl linker at one of the catechols with a ciprofloxacin cargo attached Cited by:   Growth of sentinel gram-negative bacteria in human serum before and after oral iron supplementation. S. Typhimurium (A), E. coli (B) and Y. entercolitica Cited by: Publisher Summary. This chapter focuses on iron transport in gram-positive and acid-fast bacilli. The need for continued flow of iron into rapidly dividing cells, together with the pronounced tendency of iron to form unavailable complexes at environmental conditions preferred by most biological species, have required microbial cells to construct unique iron-gathering systems.   The list of infectious disease agents whose virulence is enhanced by iron continues to increase. 5 These pathogens include bacteria (Gram-negative and Gram-positive), fungi, and viruses. Table 1. Organisms whose growth in body fluids, cells, tissues, and intact vertebrate hosts is known to be stimulated by excess iron.

  The list of infectious disease agents whose virulence is enhanced by iron continues to increase.5 These pathogens include bacteria (Gram-negative and Gram-positive), fungi, and viruses. Table 1. Organisms whose growth in body fluids, cells, tissues, and intact vertebrate hosts is known to be stimulated by excess iron. Ferrous iron ions are believed to diffuse freely through the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, with subsequent transport through the inner membrane by the ABC transporter FeoABC. This system is conserved in many species, and it was first discovered in the . All bacteria, both pathogenic and saprophytic, are unicellular organisms that reproduce by binary fission. Most bacteria are capable of independent metabolic existence and growth, but species of Chlamydia and Rickettsia are obligately intracellular organisms. Bacterial cells are extremely small and are most conveniently measured in microns ( m). They range in size from large cells such as.   Whilst most of the microorganisms recognized as exoelectrogens are Gram-negative bacteria, the electrogenicity of Gram-positive bacteria has not been .

  Diglycine Enables Rapid Intrabacterial Hydrolysis for Activating Anbiotics against Gram‐negative Bacteria. Angewandte Chemie , (31), DOI: /ange Gram-negative bacteria, like Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia pestis, and Neisseris meningitidis contain redundant, TonB-dependent iron uptake pathways. that either internalize ferric siderophores or strip the metal from eukaryotic iron proteins. Gram-positive bacteria, like. Intracellular iron storage receptors to expropriate siderophores from heterologous bacteria, and ferric iron reductases and transporters for the acquisition of free inorganic iron. While many of these systems are highly conserved between diverse genera of bacteria, others are constrained to specific pathogenic species and are a reflection. The cell envelope of gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa consists of three different layers, the outer membrane, the peptidoglycan.