Rethinking the relationship between religion, secularism and liberal democracy
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Rethinking the relationship between religion, secularism and liberal democracy toward a democratic theory for Muslim societies. by Nader A. Hashemi

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Published .
Written in English


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This dissertation challenges the belief that religious politics and liberal-democratic development are structurally incompatible. In the course of doing so, three key arguments are advanced: (1) In societies where religion is the primary marker of identity, the road to liberal democracy, whatever other twists and turns its makes, cannot avoid passing through the gates of religious politics. The primary theoretical implication that flows from this position that is relevant for the study of liberal democracy in Muslim societies is that the process of democratization and liberalization cannot be de-linked from debates about the normative role of religion in government. (2) Liberal democracy requires secularism. While this equation is not in dispute, two caveats are in order: first, religious traditions are not born with an inherent democratic and secular conception of politics. These ideas must be socially constructed. In the context of an emerging liberal democracy, how secularism becomes indigenized as part of the political culture is an important---and oft-neglected---part of this debate. Equally significant are the different models of political secularism that liberal democracy might accommodate. (3) An intimate and oft-ignored relationship exists between religious reformation and political development. The first necessarily precedes the second. This is particularly true in societies under the sway of an illiberal or undemocratic religio-political doctrine. Democratization and liberalization do not necessarily require a rejection or privatization of religion but what they do require is a reinterpretation of religious ideas with respect to the moral basis of legitimate political authority and individual rights. By engaging in this reinterpretation, religious groups can play an important role in the development and consolidation of liberal democracy.This dissertation analyzes the relationship between religion, secularism and liberal democracy, both theoretically and in the context of the contemporary Muslim world. The central problematic that this inquiry seeks to resolve is the following: liberal democracy requires a form of secularism yet simultaneously the main, political, cultural and intellectual resources that Muslim democrats can draw upon are religious. A paradox, therefore, confronts the democratic theorist.Overall, this dissertation argues for a rethinking of democratic theory so that it incorporates the variable of religion in the development and social construction of liberal democracy.

The Physical Object
Pagination459 leaves.
Number of Pages459
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21302671M
ISBN 100494078197

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  QUESTIONS ABOUT THE PROPER place of religion in a democracy and the separation of church and state remain in the news. In the United States, legal and social battles about the proper place to draw the line between religion and government are being waged around the issues of abortion, gay marriage, faith-based social services, and other well-publicized . Islam, Secularism, and Liberal Democracy: Toward A Democratic Theory for Muslim Societies. By HashemiNader. New York: Oxford University Press, ix + pp. $65 - Volume 3 Issue 3 .   Many Muslims, on the other hand, associate it with the colonial/imperialist agenda, oppressive regimes and hostility to religion as exemplified by the more rigid (French) laïcité version. What needs to be defined, Hashemi asserts, is the precise relationship between secularism and liberal democracy. In Islam, Secularism, and Liberal Democracy, Nader Hashemi challenges the widely held belief among social scientists that religious politics and liberal-democratic development are structurally incompatible. This book argues for a rethinking of democratic theory so that it incorporates the variable of religion in the development of liberal Cited by:

Religion is the opposite number to secularism: no secularism, no religion. The relationship between these two is far from ‘natural’; it has been constructed in particular histories under particular pressures. There being many secularisms, makes it /5(7). Islam, Secularism, and Liberal Democracyargues for a rethinking of democratic theory so that it incorporates the variable of religion in the development of liberal democracy. In the process, it proves that an indigenous theory of Muslim secularism is not only possible, but is a necessary requirement for the advancement of liberal democracy in. Today, social scientists, scholars, and political pundits rethink the meanings of secularism and its relationship to state and society. Many discuss and debate the relationship of religion to secularism and democracy. Too often, however, these discussions are “about them,” failing to sufficiently listen to, consider orFile Size: KB. This book analyzes the relationship between religion, secularism, and liberal democracy—historically, theoretically, and in the context of the contemporary Muslim world. The central issue is: liberal democracy requires a form of secularism, yet simultaneously the main cultural and intellectual resources that Muslim democrats can draw upon are.

This book analyzes the relationship between religion, secularism, and liberal democracy—historically, theoretically, and in the context of the contemporary Muslim world. The central issue is: liberal democracy requires a form of secularism, yet simultaneously the main cultural and intellectual resources that Muslim democrats can draw upon are religious. Request PDF | Islam, Secularism, and Liberal Democracy: Toward a Democratic Theory for Muslim Societies | This book analyzes the relationship between Author: Negin Hashemi.   What needs to be defined, Hashemi asserts, is the precise relationship between secularism and liberal democracy. He suggests, echoing others, that . Islam, Secularism, and Liberal Democracy argues for a rethinking of democratic theory so that it incorporates the variable of religion in the development of liberal democracy. In the process, it proves that an indigenous theory of Muslim secularism is not only possible, but is a necessary requirement for the advancement of liberal democracy in.